Inadvertently got sucked into this “Asian-American hate”……. Eff this.

Total morons are harassing “Asian Americans. ” If that happens to me, I’ll just yell, I’M MEXICAN ! ! ! ( or PUERTO RICAN. )

Ay, Caramba ! !

Seriously.

*le sigh*

Anyway,

I have a million and one thoughts swirling on my mind at the moment. But I’m holding them back because I’m sure y’all gonna hate me if I blurt them out, right here, right now, uncensored and unfiltered.

Ugh.

My mom and I went to Costco last week. My bf who is 6’2″, white, and looks like a firefighter ( whatever that means, lol ) came with us, just in case. Don’t mess with him, he he. ( In fact, his mom who lives in Florida and is an avid Trump supporter, lol, called to tell him to keep me safe…..Gee, thanks, Ma’am. * two thumbs up * )

  • shakes head *

The world’s gone bonkers. Sheesh.

This is all for now. Oh, yeah, I’ll tell you the result of my second dose of vaccine next time. I’ll have it tomorrow, Saturday.

Bye ! ! Take care, and stay safe.

34 responses to this post.

  1. It’s sweet of your boyfriend to be with you while you shop at Cosco, just in case.

    Reply

  2. How sad is it that even going for grocery doesn’t feel safe..I dunno what the world has come to.. Anyway, so nice of your bf!

    Reply

  3. Congrats on your second shot. Not sure saying you’re Mexican will help in some circles. Better take your BFE (Bodyguard For Ever). In Grad school, late 70’s I had a great Iranian friend we called Al Pacino. Looked a bit like him. When the Ayatollahs took power in Iran and the Islamic revolution started he started saying (obligatory American question: “And where are you from?”) that he was Italian. Then Italian terrorists kidnapped and killed a former Italian Prime Minister. My friend told me: “Bro, I’m doomed!”
    Stay safe. And away form idiots.
    πŸ™πŸ»

    Reply

    • About me being Mexican….. for some reason, I thought you’d say something about this, lol. The news here in the US is that Asian Americans are getting abused verbally and the elderly ones are getting punched on the streets. What surprises me most is the fact that some of the perpetrators are African-Americans who are victims themselves of discrimination. I have a theory why this is so, and that’s one of the million thoughts on my mind, but I don’t want to write about this as it’s very controversial and provoking.

      Reply

      • I’m sure it is. Provoking. One of my daughters is very strong on gender issues and “intersectionality”. I don’t argue on the latter, but it has its conceptual limitations. There are many instances proving that there is very little “solidarity” between minorities. In Paris, there is a large “Chinatown” in the 13th district. (many of whom are actually Vietnamese! LOL) There have been tweets calling blacks and Arabs to beat the crap out of the “Chinese” in the 13th. Not good. And there have been a few cases. It’s worse, isn’t it when they beat up the elderly?
        Jesus! So much growing violence everywhere. I hope your parents are well. And y’all be careful. (Did you fix the problem with the house you were renting?)
        Stay safe, my friend. πŸ™πŸ»

        Reply

        • You mean the house we’re renting out ? Yes, we did. My parents spent almost 50K for that. We’re still paying Home Depot for the materials we bought, 2 years to pay without interest . 6 months to go.

          We have a Vietnamese neighbor next door…. and she told us she wanted to stick a piece of paper on her shirt with a sign, ” I’m Vietnamese.” LOL

          Yes, my thoughts are more provoking rather than controversial. For something controversial, it may or may not be true… for something thought- provoking, more often than not, there’s a kind of truth in it that people who ” know” don’t want to say for fear of adding to an already tense situation ,but Bill Maher said it all on his show ( and that was years ago. )

          Yes they beat up women and the elderly because they can’t physically fight back in a confrontation.

          Reply

          • 50k? Jesus! (I’m selling my properties in Paris. No big deal. A couple of studios. Just not worth it financially)
            Most probably won’t know the difference between Vietnamese and Chinese or where it is. The rest might actually beat her up for the Vietnam war, when she’s probably a “boat people” of some sort. At least an escapee of Vietnam. The tramp has sowed so much hate… may he be damned. (At least we have been saved from his tweets for a few months now.
            Provoking is fine. Don’t know about “controversial.” Lately it seems it is one the 5 most used words by journalists the world over.
            Women and elederly? Shame. Shame. Be careful my dear. In this day and age? I almost got mugged in Paris two years ago, broad daylight, le Marais. Close call.
            My wife and I rescued a young woman in the metro around 10PM from a potential sexual assault. Again, top neighbourhood.
            πŸ™πŸ»

            Reply

            • Asians can somehow tell the difference. Vietnamese from Chinese, Koreans from Japanese and so on. I’m surprised non-Asians can’t tell the difference between Southeast Asians ( Filipinos, Indonesians, Thai, Malaysians, etc. ) and East Asians ( Chinese, Japanese, Koreans ) SEAsian skin tones are different, duh. We’re brown. Maybe they just lump everyone allogether. The only ones that don’t get victimized are the South Asians. ( Indians, Pakistani, etc. )

              Just a thought…. …….. Only the “face” of East Asians are represented as Asians by the media , entertainment, etc. here in the US. I’d written about this years ago. It bugs me. Now that Asians who look like them are being harassed , they want us SeastAsians to be sucked in and be included. Ever wonder why you rarely find BROWN , DIRTY, UGLY POOR Southeast Asians in their protests ? I really, really want to talk about this, brutally frank and unfiltered. I guess this is why I can’t talk about this brutal truth. It’s not xenophobia.

            • I can tell – generally – Chinese from Japanese, Filipinos, Malays. There are subtle differences. (But I was born in Pakistan, and have traveled a lot, so I look for details). The same way, in Europe I can often tell Germans from French from English from Spaniards or Italians. Sometimes you miss. Most people don’t know how to look. One thing I learned in Asia for instance was to give an object with both hands. More polite in some places. Europeans just use one hand. Americans throw things so you can catch them. In Latin America it is very rude.

            • At any rate, racists abound and will use any pretext sadly. All the more reason to be careful. I had to re-read the 2nd part to understand. I don’t read US media, so I don’t see, but I understand. Again, it’s because “Caucasians” don’t make a difference. (Or idiots) Producers cast a Filipino (Joel de la Fuente) as a mean Japanese police officer in the Man from the high castle. Because they think: nobody will see the difference. Maybe ignorance is a form of racism? I honestly don’t know. Probably is. Ignore the ignorants.

            • 3rd. πŸ˜‰ You did put a lot of concepts in one comment. “you rarely find BROWN , DIRTY, UGLY POOR Southeast Asians”. What protests do you mean? You lost me there. talk to me. I’m interested. πŸ™πŸ»

            • * Camping here *

              About giving something to an Asian with both hands……. Sadly, Filipinos just use one hand. There’s too much western influence on the Philippines. Unlike other Asian countries where people bow their heads in greetings, Filipinos kiss the cheeks, shake hands, and do a somersault. “….” It’s TOUCH Culture in the Philippines.

            • Touch culture is not bad at all. The French kiss both cheeks. up to 4 times in some parts! LOL.
              One should make the best of the influences one gets. It’s the cards you are dealt with. But during our trip to Asia, I enjoyed many things. Leaving your shoes at the door. Even in the store where you go to buy a beer. The head bowing I find very respectful. Not to mention the prayer salute in Thailand. very elegant and polite. πŸ™πŸ»

            • They say that Philippine culture stands out like a sore thumb in Asia. I don’t know if that’s a good thing.

              The country does have so many traits similar to the rest of Asia. Like leaving shoes at the door. But we’re not as strict as the Japanese. A guest doesn’t need to leave their shoes. If guest attempts to leave his/her shoes, the host usually says, ” No, no, it’s okay…. please come in. When we were there last year, we had a reunion with more almost a hundred relatives at our house…. can you imagine if they all leave their shoes at the door ? It doesn’t make sense, LOL. And you know, Filipinos are party animals. Birthday parties, fiestas, baptisms, reunions, etc. etc. etc…. And all these events are held at home. ( But if the person is just a neighbor, or close friends, they definitely have to leave the shoes , LOL. )

              Filipinos don’t bow their heads. But we do have this ” Mano po” culture. Mano means hand. We take the hand of an elder , bow, and press our forehead on the elder’s hand. Also, in Filipino language , there are words that Filipinos use ( ALL THE TIME ! )as a sign of respect. The words are ” PO” and “OPO”. It’s unthinkable that a Filipino will not say po and opo to an older person, or to one of ” higher ” status, like a judge or the president of the Philippines, or one’s boss at work.

              I’ve already posted about this many years ago. But I find this intersting and endearing, so I think I’ll write about this again. This is a part of Filipino culture that I want my future children to practice. ( Like calling an older brother KUYA and older sister ATE. …pronounced ah-teh. )

            • I wouldn’t attach too much importance to labels. Each culture does what it thinks is best. And respect comes under many forms.
              Mano is Spanish for hand. πŸ– Interesting how so many things Spanish has stayed with you. Even your names. “Iglesias”.
              Pressing your forehead on someone’s hand seems very respectful. So “po” would be like “father”.
              I noticed that you call another Philippine blogger, Arlene, “Aunt” or was it “Tita”? I forgot. But you use a term of respect for her. πŸ™πŸ»
              100 relatives at a time? That sounds like a Mexican party. 🀣
              Kuya and Ate would be Tagalog, right?
              And how do you say younger sister?
              Salamat for all those details.
              Take care, “Socorro” πŸ˜‰

            • Yes, so many things Spanish stayed with the Philippines. The country was a Spanish colony for 377 years. ( Mexico for 300 years ) , from 1521 to 1898. All inhabitants were mandated to have Spanish names. Spain had total influence on the Philippines, including religion. The Philippines is the 3rd largest Catholic country in the world, Brazil being first, then Mexico. ( 85% ) Although Spain failed to replace native language, Filipino language is about 40% have Spanish roots, or straightforward Spanish. Filipinos tell time in Spanish.

              No, “po” (and “opo” ) is not father. It’s just a word used to show respect. “Po” is interpersed in a sentence. You can add it at the ending, or in the middle of a sentence. No rules, as long as it doesn’t sound awkward. LOL For ex : Good morning po, Auntie. Good morning po, Sir. Opo is respectful Yes. Of course, they don’t say “po” to people their age. * whisper * There are people who aren’t comfortable when others use “po” when talking to them….. it makes them feel old, LOL ..

              Right ! ! ! I address blogger Arlene as Tita Arlene or just Tita. I cannot call her Arlene… it’s so disrespectful to a Filipino elder. I’d call you Tito Equinoxio if you were a Filipino elder. Maybe I’ll just call you Sir Equinoxio ??? Btw, Tita also means Aintie.

              Ate (Ah-teh) is older sister.
              Kuya ( Koo-yah ) is older brother.

              I have one older brother so I call him Kuya. If I happen to have 2 older brothers, then I need to add the name, like Kuya James and Kuya John. Same with older sisters.

              There’s no term for the youngest child he he. Oh, wait, my younger cousins call me Ate Ren ! ! Yay !

              We say Salamat po to an older person.

            • You put up with the Spaniards a little while longer. πŸ˜‰ Now I imagine you all speak a mixture of Tagalog, Spanish and English, right?
              Understand the concept of “Po” and “opo”. So I would be Tito Brian? (I thought Tita could be “TΓ­a”.) Be my guest. Having lived in East Africa, I speak a little Swahili where the word “Mzee” means “old man” and is a show of respect. I have come to realize I am a Mzee now. Quite a shock I must tell you. Tito Brian is fine. Whatever makes you feel at ease. I felt “Tita Arlene” was charming. (You know her daughter just gor COVID, right? But apparently she’s fine now)
              Don’t worry about phonetics. Unlike Americans I speak enough languages to understand the phonetics. I even learned a few words of Bahasa Malayu when I was in Asia. Need to include Philippines on our next Asian trip.
              I always appreciate how knowledgeable you have remained of your culture. I love to learn about that. Salamat to you my young “niece”. πŸ™πŸ»πŸ˜‰

          • Have you heard of #CancelKorea , … this was led by Filipino netizens againts Koreans. It’s a long story. Check out CancelKorea on Youtube. I ‘m so glad Filipinos finally ” woke.”

            Reply

  4. yes please stay safe

    Reply

  5. Posted by Serene on April 5, 2021 at 3:46 pm

    How do you feel after taking the first jab?

    Reply

  6. Being half Filipino and the rest of me of four European nationalities– in New Jersey people thought I was Puerto Rican, in Texas… Indian, in Hawai.. Hawaiian, and in California… Mexican. So I suppose I’m some form of minority wherever I go. Too bad about all this prejudice. Peace.
    Art

    Reply

  7. Hope the second jab went OK. Mine is at the end of May, Hate racism and all the narrow intolerances behind it but you probably guessed that already !

    Reply

  8. Canadian and American citizens of East Asian heritage have been increasingly verbally and/or physically assaulted during the last year, the perpetrators perhaps under some delusion their targets are willful creators/spreaders of Covid-19. Many have no Chinese lineage, though their assailants seem to not care, maybe due to a hateful perception that they’re β€˜all the same’. Overlooked is that there’s a good chance the assault victims came here to escape precisely that which we generally despise about some East Asian nation governances, including that of China.

    Reply

  9. You’re definitely right on that. Clearly, many people will always find an excuse to despise and abuse those who are superficially different β€” and all the more so if the latter are also successful and/or have managed greater savings (etcetera) through hard work and/or thrift budgeting.

    Also, sometimes the victim is a convenient political football or scapegoat. The current anti-East-Asian abuse brings to my mind the 2007-08 financial crisis, which resulted in the biggest, and perhaps the most culpably corrupt, mainstream U.S. bankers not being criminally indicted but rather given their multi-million-dollar performance bonuses via taxpayer-funded bailout. Yet, the feds, in a classical cowardly move, only charged some high-level staff with a relatively small-potatoes Chinese-American community bank as a figurative sacrificial lamb that couldn’t really fight back and who looked different from most other Americans.

    However, if there’s any COVID-19 blame, it should be laid in large part with the travel-related industries, particularly the airlines. When the coronavirus crisis began, they were the most influential voice to have the ear of government, when it should have been solely the health sciences community. The result was resistance against an immediate halt in travel, including international flights β€” weeks of delay that may have translated into many additional and needless COVID-19 deaths.

    Reply

  10. Sorry in advance for any stupidity that comes your way. Maybe if people got out of their bubble more often and actually learned about each other you wouldn’t need a bodyguard…Meanwhile as a young woman AND a minority, do as the Marines say: stay alert, stay alive. The world needs you even if it doesn’t know it yet.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: