Filipino Cuisine atbp.

Hello !  Renxkyoko Iglesias here.

 

Ah, Philippine  cuisine  !  Where do I even begin ?  Last week,  a friend of mine  ” ordered ”  lumpia  (  meat eggrolls ) from yours truly, good for 20 people.  She’s  Guatemalan.  The truth is,  friends and co-workers have been ordering  trays of food from me for several years now, including 2 Persian friends whom I have been cooking for, for  their Thanksgiving, and believe it or not , Christmas parties.  The Persians  usually order  fried , vegetable rolls, beef stew ( caldereta ) ,  chicken adobo, leche flan ( egg custard ) and  a few desserts and salads.   It’s my underground business, but I don’t think  the government will be interested  in taxing  my  $ 75 earnings.  I do it as a favor. In fact, I don’t want to do this anymore. It’s labor intensive,  And if it’s just one tray of dish,  forget it.  I mean, after deductions, I get  what, a $ 5 profit ?     I    loath myself  when that happens.

 

Oh, wait, before anything else , here’s a video that I hope you can watch. I find it funny because I noticed it too when I was in the Philippines.  Just 3 minutes, folks, so please click, and be educated.

 

 

Compress ! !  I often heard that word in the Philippines. Ha ha ha !

Anyway, this is not what this post is all about. It’s Filipino cuisine.  Again, where do I begin ?

 

To start off……. I’ve been wondering why there are so few  Filipino restaurants  here in the US.  Filipinos are the second largest immigrant minority group in California,( after the Mexicans,)  and the third largest in the US, so where are the restaurants ?  My mother and I  have been discussing  the possible reasons and have come up with 1 million reasons for this anomaly.

a)  Filipinos who come to the US are not risk takers.  They do not come here to the US to open restaurants, in the first place.  I can say with almost 99 % certainty that Filipinos who come here are mostly professionals and college educated……. doctors, nurses, engineers, accountants, healthcare professionals, chemists,  etc.  Filipinos do not consider being  a ” chef ” as a career or a profession. Besides that, even with considerable savings at their disposal, Filipinos do not like to lose it all  on a venture that has a short lifespan,  5 years at most , if you’re lucky.  It’s preferable to toil away at a safe 9 to 5 job for a house, 2 cars, the kids’ education,  maybe for some rest and recreation in Rome and Paris , and a lifetime pension where they can spend the rest of their lives  smelling  roses ………….instead of worrying  about their restaurants  going under,  for  the rest  of their lives.  Filipinos are what my mother calls ” segurista ” ,meaning a person who makes sure things happen according to plan………… which is, oddly enough, the complete opposite of  the more common trait of Filipinos, the ” bahala na ” attitude, which means, whatever, come what may, if it will happen, it will happen.  (  this comes from Filipinos ‘ response to numerous  yearly natural disasters….. volcanic eruptions, eathquakes,  off- the- chart typhoons, floodings, dictators, colonizers, (  Spain and US ) you name it, Filipinos get it.   It’s fatalistic, but at the same time, having a positive attitude. Filipinos do not mope ! I guess Filipinos accept events that they cannot control….. but segurista for things they can .

 

Where was I ?  Oh, yeah, Filipino food…..

 

b)    Filipino food sucks.   Not true, not true at all.  Filipino food can be a bit funky,  but  oh, so flavorful and savory , umami ! !  The taste is bold and  audacious.  Example :  Chocolate soup, or blood soup.  I mean, who will order that in a restaurant, besides Filipinos ?  Filipinos eat that with  gusto, with, of course, rice or , believe it or not, bread . They dunk the bread in the soup, folks.  Oh, do I hear , Eeeeeew !   My breakfast in England for 3 days included  blood sausage,  and in Spain,  morcilla  .  In Romania, they also have blood soup, just like in the Philippines which  Bizzare Foods show’s Andrew Zimmern duly noted. Oh, wait,  they eat  blood in Romania ?  Just kidding.  Thumbs up to you, Romanians.

 

c)    Filipinos prefer to cook at home, and family home-style cooking.   Why will they go to a restaurant to eat food they  cook at home , everyday, and swearing, their moms cook it better, anyways ? They prefer to eat something different.  Don’t get me wrong…. Filipinos love dining out…. in fact , in the Philippines, restaurants are always full,  diners wait to get seated, or  they just make reservations ( 2 weeks at Vikings ) if they don’t want to wait.. Food courts are everywhere,  not to mention, the ubiquitous  street food , and numerous ” carinderias “. ( Carinderias are low – tiered eateries , usually located  at  low- income areas , schools and universities,  where customers point at the food they want to eat. They also call them ” turo – turo“……… turo means point, so it’s point-point . ( Have I mentioned Filipinos like to repeat words ? ) Unfortunately,  most Filipino restaurants here in the US are turo-turo style, with food Filipinos cook at home,  and  to be honest,  they don’t look appetizing , especially to non – Filipinos.  Blood soup, anyone ?  What in the world , is that mud-looking dish ?

 

Below is a carinderia in the Philippines. Not much to look at, but the food is soooooooo delicious ( and cheap !!!!!!! )

 

... Business - How to Start a Carinderia Business | Business Diary Ph

 

 

842 words…… time to sign off, and to be continued …… 9, 997 reasons to go.

And please check out my anime/manga/video games blogsite @ http://2megaworthitwordpresscomblog.wordpress.com/    I have new entry, a review of RWBY, an anime created by an American developer, Rooster Teeth.  Yay, homegrown.

 

Thanks for reading. Peace.

 

 

 

 

102 responses to this post.

  1. I love filipino food!
    We had a restaurant open here. It didn’t stay open long. But boy people did love it.
    Now you made me hungry!😂😍

    Reply

    • I’m curious, what Filipino food have you tried, so far, Rebecca ? And what are your favorites ?

      And do you know why that restaurant closed ?

      Reply

      • i dont know the names of the food, however I have tried leche flan. a soup that had baby corn and cabbage, lumpia,bibingka,Embutido (my favorite)
        i dont know why the restaurant closed. although it was popular, most restuarants close within six months because our town is just too damn picky. one review on fb can either make it or break a restuarant. everyone reads that damn page.

        Reply

        • Like Yelp ? Food reviews are so unfair, aren’t they ? Competitors can always give vitriolic reviews and that’s that.

          I know that baby corn and cabbage soup ! ! With beef, right ? and bone marrows. That’s Bulalo ! OMG, it’s sooooo good and so unhealthy, he he he …. I mean, bone marrows ???

          I always make embutido, Rebecca, and you can, too ! It’s so easy ! It’s like, make embutido if you feel lazy, ha ha.

          Reply

          • almost like Yelp, but it was created for our local restuarants. so people can either complain or like their service. Mostly complain.
            Bulalo is very good. I tried it when the first of filipino workers came to work. yum!
            embutido is very good! my friend was surprised i liked it. Why? I like everything! it was very good, she is a very good cook!

            Reply

  2. It’s never tried filipino food but it sounds very good!😊

    Reply

    • I cannot describe Filipino food, Simon. They are very diverse…. Spanish ( the country was under Spain for almost 400 years, ) American ( under the US for 50 ), then, as expected , Chinese food’s influence is considerable…. then Malay ( Southeast Asian’s …. Indonesia etc. ). But, Filipinos have made these dishes their own, and cooked in so many different ways, that in time, have made the food uniquely Filipino.

      If you don’t live in California, it will be hard to find a Filipino restaurant.

      I hope to post a few recipes that I’m sure non -Filipinos will like, as well.

      Reply

  3. Filipino food sounds like something I would like to try, with the possible exception of blood soup. According to Google, the nearest restaurant is more than an hour’a drive from here, so it will be a while before I try it.

    As to the video, every Pizza Hut that I’ve gone to had plenty of tables, chairs, and servers to handle at least 100 people.

    Thanks for another interesting post.

    Reply

    • Oh, that’s about 100 miles away.

      Round Table Pizza in my neighborhood is a good sized restaurant, not a hole in the wall kind. It’s true though what she said about Pizza Hut in the Philippines, with wines on the table. I had been there , too.

      About the blood soup…. you have to be psychologically prepared to eat it, haha. It tastes good, but I have to admit it’s an acquired taste. Once you’ve passed squeamish stage , it’s actually delicious.

      Reply

  4. Filipino food is super tasty. My neighbors are Filipino, and they gave us a sampling of their Christmas fare this year. Excellent stuff. Plus, I grew up in NY, and had a good friend who was Filipino. His mom made us awesome dinners!👍🏼😎

    Reply

  5. Interesting post and video (that girl had way too much energy – made me tired just watching).

    I’m not all that adventuresome when it comes to food. I do get rice, though; rice I like. Not as much as pasta, but it’s up there.

    Wasn’t a fan of blood dishes even when I lived in Italy (big feast when someone slaughtered a pig or cow – don’t know if it still goes on) . . . unless it’s the blood of my enemies!!!

    . . . I kid. Even then, nah; I rather just laugh maniacally as I watch their blood soak into the dirt.

    I would likely try some of the food you mention, but experience tells me I’m set in my ways (food-wise).

    Reply

    • With Filipino food, you need to eat it with rice to temper the strong flavor, of say, adobo, or food that has shrimp paste, he he. If you like Thai food, most of their dishes have shrimp pastes, as well.

      Oh, wait, you’re in Hawaii. I’ve heard there’s a Filipino restaurant over there named Naty’s ??? that serves fairly decent Filipino dishes. Maybe you have to check out Yelp.

      Okay….. so Italians eat blood , too ? Like, nothing is wasted ? O_O

      Reply

  6. I would like to try Filipino cuisine one day. I am kind of verse on Indian, Vietnamese, Mexican and Italian so I have room in my heart and stomach for something new.

    Reply

    • You befriend a Filipino, Tony, and one day, you’ll get invited to a Filipino party. There are always tons of delicious food, no holding back ( Filipino fiesta mentality ), and you get to eat super delicious food, like wrapped fresh vegetables ( like the Vietnamese wrapped and rolled glass noodles with peanut sauce ….. but Filipinos use brown sugar/soy sauce with roasted garlic for sauce , and I tell you, its more delicious ,and the vegetables are sprinkled with chopped peanuts ) , and the adobo, skewerd pork and chicken barbecues. Just like Americans, Filipinos have perfected the tastes of grilled /barbecued meats .

      I will post the recipes of easy to cook Filipino dishes. The ingredients are readily available, I mean, you don’t have to climb seven mountains to get a secret ingredient. He he Just don’t hold back on the garlic.

      Reply

  7. This is nice Ren, featuring our very own Filipino cuisine 🙂

    Reply

  8. Informational. I’d never thought about it. My experience with Filipinos and their food has been limited to TWO.
    One, I had a classmate/tennis partner, Mia, whose parents had come from the Philippines and I loved to eat at her house because her mother and grandmother always set out about 20 dishes every single night! I don’t know what most of it was, and I didn’t care, because YUM.
    Then, my husband served with a man who had a Filipino wife, and they had us over once and I ate her lumpia and more lumpia and craved lumpia for weeks after. So, yeah, Imma go with good food 🙂

    Reply

    • What the ! 20 dishes ? Uhm, maybe some are condiments.. condiments are placed in small plates, ( not in usual small condiment bottles ), so maybe you thought it was another dish or sumthin ? Filipinos also love desserts, mostly ” baked native desserts” like assorted rice cakes, etc. I mean , these are staples at dinners, but anyone can eat them anytime. So,if you see them spread on the table, it will look like there are so many dishes .

      The lumpia is very popular. The origin is obviously Chinese, but for some reason, this dish is now ” owned ” by Filipinos.

      We make a lot of uncooked lumpia in one go, then freeze them, then fry them later. We can have lumpia anytime. If there’s an Asian store in your area, I’m 100 % you’ll find lumpia wrapper ( the only item regular groceries here in the US do not sell ). Other than that, all the ingredients are available anywhere. You can eat lumpia to your heart’s content.

      Reply

      • I was only 12, so it maybe was only 12 dishes, but I swear, every night I ate there was a feast!
        I have the lumpia recipe, but I’ve only made it once. My family isn’t crazy about it. :/

        Reply

  9. I love Philippine food. I gained 15 pounds while stationed there, mostly on egg rolls, and Pandesal. I passed on the balut, however.

    Reply

    • and maybe on hearty Filipino breakfast of beef tapa or chorizo, garlic fried rice, and fried eggs. Ha ha ha

      My cousin and I gained 10 pounds when we were there. Oh, I love Pan de sal ! It’s their breakfast bread over there, right ?

      Reply

  10. Chocolate soup sounds good to me.

    Reply

  11. You are correct in describing us as “segurista”…. By nature, Filipinos aren’t born to be entrepreneurs – it’s ingrained in the national psyche of 300+ years of Spanish colonialism – that need to act within the confines of society.

    Reply

    • Yes, and add the fact that Filipinos do not have the necessary capital to invest, and the necessary tools to make it work. I have already seen 3 Filipino restaurants go down, and that’s sad because the potential for success is there. I can tell not much planning was done ….. they wanted easy money at the shortest possible time. There’s a newly opened restaurant near my area….. my other and I went there to check out their food…… well, the dishes are so ” common “….. other Filipinos say ” peasant “. CDo they actually think Filipinos will flock to their restaurant for fried galunggong ? The presention is so abysmal it’s so embarrassing that we pray no non – Filipino customers come in to look at the food. We’re predicting that restaurant will not last a year, just as we predicted another restaurant would also fold up in less than a year.

      Reply

      • Your comment will resonate well in Pinoy communities across the U.S.

        With 7,100 islands and various influences – we have a significantly rich heritage when it comes to food. But just like anything in our culture, we don’t pay attention to our treasures. Indeed “easy money” is easy-downfall.

        Same here in the East Coast, I’ve seen really good Pinoy restaurants open, but check it out again after 3 months – and you know their hearts aren’t into it – the owners are taking short-cuts in terms of presentation and quality. Classic “ningas kugon”.

        Reply

        • Oh, my. Putting up a restaurant involves so much money, how can they just let it go down ? Just to get a license to operate, permits, etc. takes months , then they have to buy stuff for the restaurants, industrial ovens, etc. It’s imcomprehensible.

          My mom had a successful catering business in the Philipppines. She told me it took her a year to prepare ( including the dishes she was supposed to offer on her menu…. she practiced cooking a lot of dishes for consistency and taste ) and plan. The good thing about catering is there’s no brick and mortar involved, no bad days (like cooking food no one will eat ) etc..

          There’s a very successful restaurant in LA named LA Rose. The Filipino dishes are traditional , no fusion crap whatsoever , and their presentation of Filipino dishes are excellent…… and the dishes are so good the restaurant has been asked to cater Grammy Award after parties 2 years in a row. No turo – turo style here. And it’ been open 25 years or so. The owner could have put up another one, but no… he wants to have this one and maintain its excellencet. Google LA Rose.

          Not that I look down on turo-turo…. but , man…. I see pinakbet there, it tastes great, but looks sad and unappetizing.

          Reply

  12. Now I’m feeling hungry. I bet your a brilliant cook

    Reply

    • Aaargh, I’m not , Peter . It’s just that, I’ve perfected cooking these few dishes …. make me cook some other dishes and I’m sure I’ll mess them up, big time. LOL

      Reply

  13. And with that, I want to go back to the Philippines and have ALL the remaining foods and snacks I’ve yet to try! Starting with Banana-Q and work my way to the grilled chicken skin haha 😀

    Reply

    • Ah, the banana Q ! So simple, yet so good ! I just made it last week. We bought the saba banana ( not the regular banana, okay ? ), but did skewer the fried banana. You can do it, too, Andy. Add lots of brown sugar to hot oil ( deep frying ) and then fry the bananas …. don’t worry, the brown sugar will cling to the banana, and when you take the banana out , the sugar will still cling, and turn crunchy as it cools.

      Have you tasted chicken skin chicharon ? Darn ! Its so yummy…. but, heart attack !

      Reply

    • Oh, hey, tell me what you’d eaten in the Philippines, Andy, and which ones did you like best ? Include the desserts like puto ( pardon me, he he he )

      Reply

      • I had a good laugh too when I had puto (chuckle) at the supermarket food kiosk at SM Light mall, I had no idea that a regular white bun would be called Puto haha! I almost cracked up making the order while the vendor was like O.o

        Let’s see, What did I have? Balut,Toknengneng,Calamari,Chicken intestines,Chicken blood,Regular Taho,Strawberry Taho and my favourite of all of them? It’s Toknengneng!! haha! The vinegar they make is out of this world! I’ll have to try your banana recipe though, I tried the Malaysian fried banana a long time ago and miss it greatly 😀

        Reply

      • Oh and for regular dishes? Glai made me Chicken Adobo, Tinola , Gising Gising. Wow! I could live the rest of my life with just those dishes 😀

        Reply

        • I don’t know what Gising gising is. Tinola is so delicious, isn’t it ? And such a simple dish. So good to eat in winter. And chicken adobo, what can I say . Do you know adobos taste better after a day, or 2 days…. heck, even one month….. maybe a year ? That was what the Filipino sailors ate when they travelled from Manila to Acapulco 200 years ago.

          Reply

          • I didn’t know Adobo was born from such a tradition! the secret must be in the sauce then, Glai’s sauce making for it made me eat a LOT of rice lol!

            Gising Gising is basically ground beef cooked with string beans and salted then grilled on the pan, I had that so many times and I keep wanting more lol!

            Reply

            • The vinegar is a preservative.

              I know ! Eating adobo makes us want to eat more rice ! ! The flavor is deadly strong….. eating it with rice tempers/ dilutes it. Most Filipino foods should be eaten with rice, did you notice ? Chorizo/egg with rice, hotdog with rice, heck, even Spam with rice ! ( breakfast food ) Ha haha ! Hotdog with rice is so funny. My co-workers once saw me eating hotdog with rice ( for lunch ), ha ha ha ! Just imagine our conversation.

            • Your family brought the love for rice from the Philippines to the U.S! lol

            • Every Filipino who are here now , did. There’s a joke why it’s always foggy in Daly City ( near San Francisco )……. the fog comes from all that steam coming out from the rice cookers. He he By the way, majority of Daly City’s population are Filipinos. They call the place Adobo City.

            • AH HAH! So that’s where clouds come from! 😛 you will have to showcase all your rice accompanied dishes sometime!

              Know what though? I can’t find the fragrant rice that I had in Manila here in Vancouver, It was really aromatic and texture is so perfect, plus there’s something about buying it from the vendor that feels right, if that makes sense?

            • The rice most probably is ” Denorado ” . I’m sure they’re selling this kind of rice in your area. Sometimes, it’s called ” Milagrosa ” or Jasmine Rice. Or, I wouldn’t be surprised if the rice you ate in Manila had tanglad leaves ( lemongrass ) added Sometimes , Mom buys that leaf at the Filipino store, and it does give off that nice aroma while it’s cooking. If you want to have that sweet aroma in your roast chicken, stuff the inside of the chicken with lemongrass leaves before baking the chicken,

            • Ya! Jasmine, that’s one of the ones that I did have, We do have them at the markets here in Van, But they are slightly more pricey, I’ve never had lemongrass infused rice though, Interesting!

            • I’m not sure all Asian stores sell lemongrass, but they actually do at the Filipino supermarket and other Asian stores. Sure thing at a Filipino super coz Filipinos use lemongrass a lot. The Tagalog word is Tanglad.

              Filipinos actually prefer the ordinary rice because they they’re not sticky ( Denorado, Milagrosa, and Jasmine are kind of )…….. Filipinos fry rice a lot and you know, we don’t want sticky fried rice. Right?

            • About the dislike for sticky rice I definitely agree! I noticed that over there the rice grains actually separate, which I enjoy too because it really gives the flavours 🙂

              Sounds like I really need to shop more the next time I’m in the Philippines! possibly next February ☺️🤗

  14. Video is hilarious. That is a genius idea to charge for leftovers at buffets. You should definitely charge more for your catering services because $5 is criminal.

    Reply

    • Volume really makes the difference. Like, I go to a far-away Filipino supermarket, using at least 1/4 of my gasoline ( some ingredients are not found at our neighborhood supermarkets , like egg wrappers ), so I go thru all these for one tray of spring rolls. It’s not worth it. And I can’t charge as much , because then , the food will be very expensive.

      Reply

  15. awesome your blog..keep going on..you can visit us for best Health info or more info at Health Share PORT

    Reply

  16. Hi Ren,
    I hope you don’t mind me sharing your video at http://Yehey.com website to showcase your funny video.

    Thank you in advance,
    EM @Yehey.com

    Reply

  17. […] via Filipino Cuisine atbp. — renxkyoko’s space […]

    Reply

  18. I love the food in The Philippines, I didn’t have one meal I didn’t enjoy, they were all fantastic and I sampled a lot of foods. I am a pancit fiend, I can’t get enough of the stuff and it just so happens there is a local restaurant with a Filipino menu. I will definitely go there when I can afford it.

    Reply

    • I thought I’d responded to your comment already ! Ugh .

      Do you know I eat pancit sandwich? Ha ha Try it.

      Do you remember the names of the foods you’d eaten ? You can describe them if you’ve forgotten the names. Let me guess, you had adobo ( chicken or pork )

      Reply

      • Good question, I had so much I forget, I do remember the adobos, coconut crab, squid and other various sea beasties, the peanut butter dish from Kuya J’s, sisig, a couple of wonderful steaks, Jollibee chicken too! Pancit sandwiches sound amazing, I need to source some Pancit.

        Reply

        • Oh, the peanut butter dish ! Kare-kare ! I love it. We make kare-kare here in the US, but it’s aaaargh, we use peanut butter, ha ha… I hope you’d eaten the authentic one. Sisig is Anthony Bourdain’s most favorite Filipino dish. ilipinos call it a Hang-over Dish.

          Reply

          • That’s the dish Kare-Kare, I wasn’t sure it would be my thing but I enjoyed it very much but preferred Sisig, I could eat that all day…once all the Pancit is gone of course.

            Reply

            • I ‘m sure what you had was the regular pancit. They have different kinds of pancit….. I like pancit Malabon. It has all kinds of seafoods in it.

            • I tried three different types including Malabon…I loved them all, I need a T shirt with Pancit Fiend written on it

            • Whoa, really ? pancit malabon ? Let me guess, the other one is Pancit Palabok. ( it’s orange in color,from the shrimp sauce )…..

            • The names escape me but I was told I’d had all three, I was hoovering up all food in sight so get confused sometimes over what I did have.

  19. Too bad, this does make me want to try some dishes. I have a friend who has cooked some of her recipes for me, but it’s been fairly “safe” stuff.

    Reply

  20. I’ve only tried Filipino food once, and the flavors were very strange to me. Some of the stuff you’ve shown on your blog looks pretty good, though. I do like Thai and Vietnamese food.

    Reply

  21. Nice Blog… :).. Thanks for the thoughts you shared

    Reply

  22. It is 8:36 am in Niagara and I am now starving.
    Thank you, young lady.
    Lol

    Reply

  23. Nice, now I’m drooling *__*

    Reply

  24. You make me laugh on your underground business , ever since I was small never eat that blood soup . I don’t know why ? That is why they call me Iglesias in kristo .

    Reply

  25. Posted by The Twentysomething Social Recluse on May 28, 2017 at 1:44 pm

    Now I really want to try Filipino food! Not sure about blood soup, though…

    Reply

    • They’re actually good, and very diverse. So many foreign influences… Asian, Spanish, American, and of course, indigenous. The blood soup….. it tastes good….. I’ve seen some YouTubers eating the dish, and they are quite amazed that it’s actually delicious and it’s too bad it’s gotten quite a bad rap. But I understand that people run away fro the dish , because, blood. ^__^ ” Sometimes, though, it’s good to have low expectations, so if they ever manage to try the dish, opinions go up positively.

      Reply

  26. Blood soup? May I ask why that is so called?

    Reply

  27. Reblogged this on Spiritual Challenges.

    Reply

  28. I enjoy watching that Jessica video , very funny and real.

    Reply

  29. I really miss filipino food! By the way, I have nominated you for the Versatile Blogger Award. You very well deserve this and I just wanted to let you know about it. 🙂 http://www.japantrekker.com/nominated-for-the-versatile-blogger-award/

    No obligation. You can choose to participate if you want to. Cheers!

    Reply

  30. Sooooooooooo hungry now!

    Reply

  31. Thanks, Ren, now I am going out to my favorite restaurant! I love the cuisine, and after serving in the military and being stationed in Hawaii, I was really spoiled by my Filipino sister and brothers. Hugs my sister!

    Reply

  32. i love crispy pata. continue…

    Reply

  33. At least they have Filipino grocery stores and fish markets in our San Diego area. Being part Filipino, I find the need to occasionally partake of these products. Have a wonderful day.

    Reply

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