Philippine culture, part 2

Renxyoko Iglesias here, hello ! !

 

Here are some random Philippine habits, quirks, bits and pieces of culture and tradition that a tourist, like my friend @Ste J, may or may not encounter in the Philippines.

But before that, here’s something nice to watch.

 

 

Did you watch it ?  Of course,  I have to admit  there’s poverty all over, especially in urban areas ,  but Filipinos are consistently on the list of the happiest people on earth, despite the natural disasters that come their way,  year in and year out.(  off the chart typhoons, their current  president, earthquakes, volcano eruptions ….. Mt. Pinatubo’s eruption in 1991 was the biggest in the 20th century….. it caused the lowering of the earth’s temperature by at least 1 degree )  They say Filipinos eat disasters for breakfast, and no matter what happens, they just shrug them off. This is because of their ” Bahala na ”  attitude, which means, roughly, ” That’s the way it is, so live life to the fullest. ”  The exact translation is ” Whatever “, accompanied by shrugging of shoulders.  I’ve heard some Filipino friends say ” Bahala na si Batman. ” meaning, ” Whatever, Batman’s got my back. ”

 

In a crowd, Filipinos respond to ” Oy ! ! ”   ( Huh ? Who’s calling me ? )  Oy ! Comusta ! !  (  Hey, how are you ? ) However, Filipinos don’t say ” oy ” to older people.  That’s very disrespectful.

 

When Filipinos speak to older people, their language is interspersed with ” po  ”  or ” opo ” ( yes ).  It’s a sign of respect. However, the use of  po is nuanced.  Some people will not appreciate hearing ” po ” when, say,  a 25 year old person is speaking to a 30 year old woman . It’s like , ” Oh, noooooo !   She’s saying ” po” to me ! I’m getting olddddddd ! ! !”  Still…. it’s unimaginable for a Filipino to not say ” po ” to a …. okay, much older person. It’s okay, though,  for a 7- year old kid to say   ” po” to a 15 year old teenager ….. I think  ?

 

Filipinos are party animals…… and every Filipino household owns a karaoke. ( Videoke now ) We own a Magic Mic here at home, and my mother’s planning to update it to a videoke  soon. Yay ! ! I can now  sing my heart out . And yes,  Filipinos love fiestas!

 

Just like other Asians, Filipinos are big on honorifics.  I call my older sister ” Ate “,(pronounced Ah-teh,) meaning older sister, and my older brother,  Kuya (  pronounced Koo-yah, meaning , older brother ) .  Ate  Jennie,  Kuya Benjie, or just plain Ate and Kuya, unless one has other older siblings, then they have to add their names.

 

And this is where Filipinos differ from other Asians……… how they greet  each other.   Filipinos sometimes greet each other ( usually men ) by tossing their heads upwards. Oy, ‘  Pare,  comusta. ( ‘ Pare is short for Spanish word Compadre, meaning, pal/buddy), then a handshake, and a pat on the back.  Filipino women greet each other and relatives , male and female alike, with a hug and kiss on the cheek, sometimes, both cheeks. The term is beso- beso. Beso means kiss in Spanish, I think ?  Greetings are  boisterous. When we had a reunion in the Philippines, I think I hugged and kissed a hundred relatives and guests in one day. The kissing and hugging are repeated when they say  their goodbyes.    It is, indeed,  a touch culture. By the way, Filipinos greet their elders  by touching their elder’s hand to their foreheads, and saying, ” Mano po, Lola” ( grandma  or Lolo, grandpa) Mano means hand in Spanish.

pasko_mano-po

Filipino Customs and Traditions(

Got the image from the Internet. Whoever owns this, please don’t sue me. T.T

 

They call Restrooms/toilets in the Philippines, CR. ( Comfort Room )  ” Excuse me, Miss, where’s the CR ?”  @ Ste J, remember this. ^___^

 

This is all for now. Another one coming right up..

 

And check out my anime/manga site at http://2megaworthitwordpresscomblog.wordpress.com/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

68 responses to this post.

  1. Everything that you wrote here are true and we at home are practicing them….and to a lesser extent, the “bahala na” attitude is still in the blood stream of everyone….Karaoke time is a favorite in my province ….! 🙂

    Reply

    • Everyone’s a relative ! Ha ha ha ! ” Ren, this is Aunty Cora, she was my best friend in highschool ( then she gets hugged and kissed ), and this is your Tita Jen, I met her at Seafood City supermarket last week. ” LOL

      Bahala na culture has its bad and good side. Bad side is , Filipinos leave the future to fate, like que sera, sera, what will be, will be. Good side is, that’s how Filipinos cope with bad stuff that happens to them. They don’t mope .

      Karaoke = Filipinos. LOL

      Reply

      • That’s the Fil culture…a mixed of Spanish, Chinese, American,etc…..hehehe…By the way, i’ve read before that Karaoke was invented by a filipino company (Trebel Corp….it was called Sing Along system…thanks a lot! Good day !

        Reply

        • The company of this del Rosario guy. It’s debatable. A Japanese also is taking credit, but del Rosario who was also working on it managed to patent it. Karaoke is a Japanese word, though, isn’t it. I guess the Japanese company was the first to manufacture it, tough luck for del Rosario.

          Reply

          • oh. i see…! that’s as far as i can remember… i’m not sure if i am correct but, the Japanese invention was only the audio, minus-one system and it was the filipino comp. that added the video… i have here the minus-one system at home, hahaha, and its evolution systems up to the karaoke…hahaha…i have a complete systems at home which were left to the dust…more than 15 years not in use.., tinatamad na….so, you have researched the issue….you’re very resourceful person…. 🙂 hangang d2 nalang….kakain pa! 🙂 whoever invented those, they made singing easy to follow and sing along….Let’s sing! dahil sa iyo ako’y lumigaya, dahil sa iyo…. 🙂

            Reply

            • I hope they update the songs….. also, we don’t know most of the songs because they’re in Filipino.

            • in magic sing, the microphone has a chip which consists of old songs…you can buy several chips for different songs you like…

            • We only have one…. can you believe there’s ” How Much Is That Dog in the Window “? That’s like a 1900 song ,he he . Good thing there are a lot of Beatles songs and Led Zep’s.

              Oh, wow, we can buy a chip with new songs ? It was a gift from my aunt when she came to the US for vacation. 2010. I don’t think they’re selling videoke here. At least, not in my city. We’ll try Amazon.

            • yes, there are chips for other songs, but not preferably new songs…i think it’s available in asian electronic stores…Taiwanese, Filipino, Chinese,etc…and Korean..Korean is a better choice….but bear the lyrics, a handful are not right, just a word or two……Led Zep, my fav during my high school days, heavy metal …”How much is that dog…” i know it…

  2. We call our older brothers “ah gor” and sisters “ah jie”. Not as boisterous though! LOL

    Reply

  3. Nice summary of Pinoy characteristics.

    Reply

  4. How about pointing with the lips? 🙂

    Reply

  5. […] via Philippine culture, part 2 — renxkyoko’s space […]

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  6. […] via Philippine culture, part 2 — renxkyoko’s space […]

    Reply

  7. I have met tons of Filipinos over here in Dubai and they are usually so polite and chirpy and yes indeed I noticed that they love Karaoke 🙂

    Reply

    • Happy Belated Birthday !

      That’s quite heartwarming…….. that’s true. We have to love and appreciate ourselves first, before we can give love to others. Thank you for sharing.

      Reply

  8. So interesting! Thanks for sharing! 😊

    Reply

    • You’re welcome. I’m glad you find it interesting. I guess Filipinos are not aware whats unique to them. Although I was born there, I look at them with a different perspective.

      Reply

  9. I always like how Filipinos are always so happy! I think it is a rare occurrence that I ever see my friends angry. Upset yes, but angry no.
    They are always so cheerful and they like to make fun of me because I can’t sing to save my life. But I love singing with them!
    Oh don’t forget to try my fave leche flan!!!

    Reply

    • Uhm, Rebecca, do they have karaoke machine ? He he he

      Leche flan is so easy to make ! It’s really delicious, isn’t it, Rebecca ? So yummy !

      Filipinos are soooooooo easy- going. Have you noticed that ?

      Reply

      • Oh yes they have a huge tv and a great video-karaoke machine! I sat in leather lazy boys and sang my heart out! Made their ears bleed😂😍
        I love leche flan! It’s one of my favourite food! Although I love all the food my friends make!
        Yes they are so easy going! Even when I’m grumpy they make me laugh and feel so much better 😍

        Reply

  10. Cool list!

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  11. My father actually worked in the Philippines many years ago and always spoke of it as a happy place. I love the colour and exuberance 🙂

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    • Poor but happy. Filipinos do not take life seriously. They’re like, ” I’m so sad. ” And Filipinos will say ” Just take a bath. “

      Reply

  12. Great look into your culture.

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    • I love that they show so much respect for older people in their language…. and that Mano po culture is something that I admire so much. I did a lot of that when I was there.

      Reply

  13. Thank you, it was nice to watch a fun video on a cold and snowy Tuesday. I remember the first time someone addressed me as ma’me and how old I felt so I understand your pain – lol!!!!

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  14. Excellent! Thank you so much, this is all great advice which I will write down so I can practise it. I appreciate all your help and will be reblogging your posts soon (I know I said that a week ago but I am that far behind and a bit rubbish).

    Reply

  15. And filipinos can talk very vague and yet one can understand it like, “yung ano naano ng ano di ba?”… In plain english, ‘the what was what by a what”. Hahaha!

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    • vague and ambiguous, ha haha ! And Filipinos actually understand it, he he he. Oh, my, gosh, my parents are like that…. and me , too. Ano, paki -kuha lang yung ano. Then we just roll our eyes. Ha ha ha ! We always struggle with words. It’s roughly whatchamacallit.

      Reply

  16. Excellent !!! Looking forward to make a visit 🙂

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  17. Posted by The Twentysomething Social Recluse on March 23, 2017 at 10:56 am

    Love this! Really interesting and educational. I particularly like “whatever, Batman’s got my back” haha.

    Reply

  18. Nice BLOG!!! ADD my BLOG too!!! Kisses!!!

    Reply

  19. I love learning about different cultures and knowing more about them. Loved your post!

    Reply

  20. Reblogged this on Book to the Future and commented:
    As some of you already know, I am off to the Philippines next week for a few weeks, which explains my lack of consistency post wise. I still have time for a few more writings before I shoot off and take lots of photos and such. Typically Filipina and long time blog friend Nica has travelled to Europe but all will be good as I do things you probably wouldn’t want to do, like eat Balut (the photo of which will probably put you off).

    Reply

  21. Thank you for sharing this and thank you for your interest in my blog. I look forward to following yours.

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  22. One day I will make it to the Philippines, plus a very good people.

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  23. Happy Easter to you! 🙂

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  24. I definitely plan on visiting the philipines before my time is up in Japan. I’ve heard nothing but good things about it. Thank you for this

    Reply

  25. I love the Po part! I guess that would be like calling somebody sir or ma’am here. I really love the Filipino culture. I had some really good friends from there when I was in the Navy and living in California. I would always show interest in the culture, and they would get all excited and fill me in. I did learn a little Tagalog, but I’ve long forgotten it – even the swears. 🙂 If I remember correctly, there are many different languages in the Philippines, but Tagalog is the general one that everybody speaks. Am I remembering that correctly?

    Reply

    • Yes, there are over 100 different languages. They may sound the same to a non_ Filipino , but , believe it or not, each language ( except Tagalog ) sounds Greek to me.

      For ex:

      English : Where are you going ?
      Tagalog : Saan ka pupunta ?
      Ilonggo : ( language spoken in Iloilo ) : Diin ka makadto ?

      Yes, that would be like calling somebody sir and ma’am… somewhat. If po is uttered at the end of a sentence, then , I guess, it would be like sir/ma’am. More often than not, ” po” is uttered in the middle of a sentence, but never at the beginning.

      Reply

  26. Posted by karasculture on July 18, 2017 at 11:44 am

    Such an interesting culture. Very much like my own but also very different at the same time 🙂

    Reply

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