How To Boil an Egg, The Story

RenxKyoko Iglesias  here, hello .

Check out my anime/manga site  at http://2megaworthitwordpresscomblog.wordpress.com/

 

On my previous post  here, I promised I’d  give my reason  for my weird post, “How To Boil An Egg“.  I did make it like it was a  mystery.  Sorry , but there’s nothing earth-shaking there, no clap of thunder.  It does have a rather long back story , a story  that my parents had experienced, up close and personal.

 

I will try to keep it short, so here goes….

 

There was this person named Ferdinand Marcos, who was elected President of the Philippines in 1968.  He  was , well, I don’t know what he was, but  he   was an honor law student  and topped the Bar exams  before he became a Congressman , then the President.  But he was  brazenly corrupt (  together with his wife, Imelda Marcos  of 10,ooo pairs of shoes  ) and knew he would not be reelected .  There were massive  protests all over the country……..  so what he did was first, he suspended the writ of habeas corpus , and using his personal army ( The Armed Forces of the Philippines )  ,   was able to detain his political enemies,   and in 1971 just  3 months  after  the suspension ( September ) , and  before  the presidential election  in November, he  proclaimed Martial Law.  Philippine democracy was replaced with dictatorship and authoritarianism. He detained  senators, congressmen , and known critics, one of whom was then Senator Benigno Aquino  who was detained for more than 7 years , then exiled to the US, ( supposedly due to medical reasons ….  and here in the US, he was given a teaching job at Harvard University ) .     Marcos dictatorship lasted from 1971 to 1986 (  15 years ! ! ) when he was toppled down thru the famous People Power Revolution in February 1986,  the culmination of people’s protests that began when Senator Benigno Aquino went back to the Philippines on August 21, 1983, and assassinated right there at the airport tarmac.

EDSA Revolution pic1.jpg

The picture above was  the  funeral procession of  Senator Benigno Aquino .  The outrage was massive .  But, here’s the most unbelievable  part of the story. The day after the funeral march,  there was NO NEWS  that came out about that historical event. No photos.  None. Zero. Zilch. Nada. Soon after,  journalists, especially opinion  writers ,  wrote nothing  but    HOW TO BOIL AN EGG  .

 

That, my readers, is the back story.

Alright, this is all for now. Thanks for reading.

 

Addendum :

 

My parents were so outraged that they joined the early protest movement in 1983, right after the assassination.  It was a very dangerous thing to do then because Marcos was still in power .  Soldiers  would come knocking on doors in the night . The victims became  part of the Disappeared , the Desaparecidos . Filipinos  called it  getting ” SALVAGED “.  There were thousands of  these victims  during Marcos’ dictatorship and kleptocracy.   It came to a point when my siblings , who were then 4 and 5 years old,  had to live with friends and were moved from one house to another over 3 years ( not with my parents’ families because , of course, the government  knew who they were ).  My parents were willing to die for the country. Great story !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

91 responses to this post.

  1. Amazing story. Thanks for the history lesson, and honoring it with your egg post.

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  2. This is all very intriguing to me…

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  3. Ooh that must have been pretty scary for your family, and yet heroic!
    You have such great stories of your family

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    • Yes, it was pretty scary, and dangerous. But my parents said they had to do it.

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      • They stood up for their convictions and others that is so brave. I don’t know if I would be able to, I would like to think so.

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        • Living under that cruel dictator had become untenable. The assassination of a brave person was the straw that broke the camel’s back. My parents said any fear that they had before this disappeared.

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          • Very brave of them. When did your parents come to the states? It must have been very sad for them to leave their family behind

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            • When he graduated from college I think in ’75, the first he did was go to the US Embassy to apply for an immigrant visa. he could not stand to live under an authoritarian regime. He found it gross. It took more than a decade for the US to approve our immigrant visa. There was a point when my parents had actually forgotten that they had applied and were most surprised when they received approval. We were already doing very well in the Philippines.

  4. Great….it brings smile when you read something like this……

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  5. Let me just correct you on this Ren, Martial Law was declared on Sept. 21, 1972. I do remember it, I was in third year high school then. The following day was a Saturday and there was a news blackout, no radio, no everything.

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  6. Hi renx, yeah I suppose you got the details right. But it was such a dark period that a lot still could be told. Really sad day today…..You have admirable parents and at such a young age you experienced oppression in some way. I know martial law was already in effect a day or two before it was officially announced. sneaky really. God bless, I really hope we could sustain peace here.

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    • Oh, wait …I wasn’t born yet during Marcos’ time. It was my siblings who experienced this, though they actually can’t remember this now.

      My Mom said the suspension of the writ of habeas corpus was the beginning.

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  7. Evil dictator! I am so sorry for your family and countries hardships…just terrible!

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  8. Thank you for sharing. What a story!

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  9. Interesting story. I knew the history (and about the shoes), but was not aware of the egg angle. Thanks.

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    • The egg story is not the stuff historians will write about. ,,,,,, even our cousin’s death while in detention …… he was just one of the thousands.

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  10. wow, fantastic story. thanks for sharing it.

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    • You’re welcome. It’s like a plotline of a good political novel. Do you know Ferdinand Marcos and his family were flown away from the ” Palace ” by a helicopter , provided by the US government ? There was a huge American base nearby. They were brought to Clark Air Base, and using another US plane, were brought to Hawaii.

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  11. Posted by The Deranged Writer on November 19, 2016 at 4:17 pm

    I am amazed that your parents are two of the many people who protested and fought for the Philippines’ freedom during the Marcos era. That’s what my history teachers have been teaching for so many years, and there are a lot of anecdotes from the victims and witnesses themselves. But there are still a lot of pro-Marcos people on my Facebook and Twitter feeds, which is sad really because they really think the Marcos era is “the most peaceful era”.

    I am glad that I know someone like you even it’s just through online means. And with what is happening in our country (the recent burial of Ferdinand Marcos at the Libingan ng mga Bayani/Heroes Cemetery), those Marcos fanatics should know a thing or more about what really happened during that time. We need more people like your parents right now.

    And hello there! Remember me? I’m back, but on a different blog. 🙂

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    • Be careful of your social media interactions with this sort of people. They are there to intimidate those who oppose the government. You know what happened to the Jews in Germany.
      Yes, it’s really sad that Marcos still have supporters. It’s incomprehensible. ” tell me who you voted for, and I’ll tell you who you are. ” Be careful of these people.

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  12. Incredible. Thank you for sharing!

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  13. Hey, Ren. I guess that by now you’ve heard about what’s happened here in RP. The unhealed wounds of Martial Law are wide open again.

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    • Hello, Brian ! !

      Yes, I’ve heard of that one. Burial ground of heroes, and they buried him there ,, that thieving and murderous tyrant. A relative of ours, an honor law student from the University of the Philippines was taken by soldiers in the middle of the night , and died in detention. There was no justice. They were just informed and told to get his body at the detention camp. Just like that.

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  14. Posted by Versatile Laraib on November 20, 2016 at 6:33 am

    Hi, Nice blog 😉 Will love your support if you will give a follow back to show some love for your fellow blogger 🙂
    http://www.versatilelaraibblog.wordpress.com

    Reply

  15. They must have been terrifying times. How such evil can subdue a whole population is frightening.

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    • From time immemorial, history tells us this was a way of life for all the people in the world. The army had to be on the side of the ” leader “. to keep the people shackled. The leader had to be feared. Keep quiet or you die. That’s their motto.

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  16. Wow. Your parents were really brave and committed. It makes me even more grateful to be living in a country and place which is still pretty tranquil, although the world in which it is situated seems to be changing rather alarmingly. Always love reading your posts and wish I could stop by more often 🙂

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    • Yes, it took 3 years to remove the Marcos family from power, literally. A US helicopter flew them out of the official residence, brought to Clark Air base ( a n American air base about 100 kilometers from manila ) then flown to Hawaii. It’s almost worthy of a Tom Clancy novel.

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  17. What a story of your parents and family had to go through for the country, heroic!!15 years under his dictatorship, horrible!

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  18. Ha! Who would have thought! And your parents are for sure super brave! I remember the story about the Marcos family. Imelda had many shoes, right?

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    • My mother was one of those who were the first people tasked to enter the Marcos’ residences ( Malacanang Palace, the official residence of the Philippines ) to secure documents, etc. when the Marcoses were literally kicked out (…. well , they were taken out by US ‘copter. ) And yes, the thousands and thousands of shoes were in the basement of the Palace.

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  19. Posted by Raj Krishna on November 23, 2016 at 3:51 pm

    thanks for sharing this interesting political story, btw I must say that your parents are quite brave..respect!

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  20. I have nominated you for ” Real Neat Blog Award” My Dear Friend..!
    Please follow below link and re post on your Blog. Just waiting you..!

    https://lifewithtranquility.wordpress.com/2016/11/26/real-neat-blog-award/

    Reply

  21. You make history come alive, young lady.
    Thanks!

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  22. I love how you weave the tale into your title!

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  23. Congratulations to your parents. I will remember the egg-boiling story. There are many countries to which it applies. Salamat.

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    • You’re welcome. ( I don’t know the Filipino words for this ^_^ )

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      • Salamat banyak? (That would be Bahasa?)

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        • Never heard of banyak….. but Filipinos, Malaysians, and Indonesians belong to the Indo-Malay- Polynesian race, ( and they even look alike ) and I know salamat is Thank you in Filipino ( I think selamat in Bahasa ) so I wouldn’t be surprised if this group of people share some words.

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          • Banyak means “a lot” or something like that. Selamat applies to good morning: selamat pagi or good night: selamat malam. Terima kasih is thank you. But you are right there must be some common words. Selamat malam (good night/evening) my friend. 😉

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            • In Filipino, Good morning is Magandang umaga , 12 noon is magandang tanghali, Good afternoon is magandang hapon, and Good evening is magandang gabi. Maganda is beautiful. Beautiful night is maganda ang gabi, or magandang gabi.

              Do you know the Indonesian language ?

            • I was going to say that magandang sounded like good. But it comes from maganda. ng is probably a prefix. Beautiful in bahasa is Indah. Also a first name. 🙂 And, no, I don’t speak it. I have an E-friend in Penang, Tiffany Choong, who’s been teaching me words in Malay, which is very close to Indonesian. And a great fun to learn. So magandang gabi to you. Be happy, Renxkyoko-which-is-not-your-real-name. 😉

            • maganda ang gabi to magandang gabi is more like a contraction ( ? ) …. something like ” do not ” to don’t.

              You can also say it as ” Ang gabi ay maganda.” Which means , The night is beautiful.

              The ( And ) night ( gabi ) is ( ay ) beautiful ( maganda ). It’;s easier, right. It’s direct translation.

            • Ang gabi ay maganda… Hmmm. I like the feel and taste of it on the tongue. One can imagine the night insects chanting. The moon and stars above. A cool breeze to ease the day’s heat. the soft crash of distant waves on the sandy beach nearby. Peace. 😉
              Ang gabi ay maganda indeed. 😉

            • Ang umaga ( morning ) ay maganda din. ” Din ” means ” also, or too.

            • Salamat! (I love languages!) 🙂

            • Walang problema. Wala means none, nothing.

              I guess you have enough of this . Ha ha

            • No, I love it. Walang problema = hakuma matata! 😉
              Have a lovely week-end my dear friend.
              (Do something crazy) 😉

  24. Posted by The Twentysomething Social Recluse on November 30, 2016 at 9:57 am

    Very interesting! Thanks for sharing.

    Reply

  25. I remember the toppling of the Marcos regime very well. I had no idea about the assassination though. The media was , and still is, very biased…

    Reply

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